Margaux Crump’s “Strange Chemistry” Exhibition

The Ninth - handwoven golden thread, calf vellum, water, wood, graphite, & salt

The Ninth – handwoven golden thread, calf vellum, water, wood, graphite, & salt

It was a busy “First Friday” in downtown Raleigh, NC when I first had the pleasure of viewing an exhibition by emerging contemporary artist Margaux Crump. Entitled “Strange Chemistry,” the show investigates the potentiality of birth, decay, and desire – especially concerning how humans respond to these changes within and around them. Fittingly, much of her interest lies in human perception; how exactly do our senses mediate experience? It’s a compelling question that was partially answered on opening night.

Lust Lost - wood, iPod, gathered moth wings, & UVB light

Lust Lost – wood, iPod, gathered moth wings, & UVB light

Full Circle - iron oxide & gold rods detail

Full Circle – paper covered ball moss, iron oxide & gold rods detai

There is a powerful experiential quality about Crump’s work. Her sculptures in particular are characterized by her calculated use of materials that range from gathered plant & animal remains to ultraviolet light. As she explains in her statement, “Though I am concerned with the visual possibilities of new media, the persistent change of organic substances in my work is driven by conceptual considerations. I’m not interested in depicting an idea, but rather conveying it directly through authentic objects. In doing so, I am able to investigate, draw out, and juxtapose their innate cultural associations.” In keeping with her interest in phenomenology, her reliance on natural and transient material (such as harvested teasels, ball moss plants, and handmade paper) not only reflects, but also embodies what she views as the fleeting nature of human existence.

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The Ironically Organic Installations of Tara Donovan

Untitled [Plastic Cups] (image courtesy of Ace Gallery)

Untitled [Plastic Cups] (image courtesy of Ace Gallery)

Tara Donovan is a contemporary artist who is best known for her large scale, site-specific installations. Despite relying almost exclusively on mass-produced materials such as plastic cups or wooden pencils, her work is surprisingly biological in appearance. After all, the forms in Donovan’s installations are directly influenced by patterns of growth found in nature.

(image courtesy of Ace Gallery)

(image courtesy of Ace Gallery)

Colony Detail (image courtesy of Ace Gallery)

Colony Detail (image courtesy of Ace Gallery)

Iteration is an important aspect of her work. Aside from miscellaneous structural components (i.e. glue and whatnot), Donovan creates each installation using a single material that is modified or repeated countless times to determine the final form. The process is a sensitive one wherein the monotony of the materials reveals a surprising spectrum of hues, volume, and presence that would otherwise go unnoticed. Imagining Donovan construct her installations brings to mind a slow, methodical process wherein one can’t help but fall into a rhythm of counting physical motions and their object counterparts. The mass and repetition of Donovan’s works also brings a focus to the importance of numbers, which arguably connects back to patterns found in nature like the Fibonacci sequence.

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Introducing: Handmade on Peconic Bay

 Depending on the method, printmaking isn’t always the most eco-friendly process. With that in mind, Matthew Shapoff founded Handmade on Peconic Bay (HMPB), which is a one-man studio that specializes in Cyanotype and Vandyke printing. Relying on years of expertise, his work ranges from monoprints on paper to wearable accessories – each of which is crafted by hand in his Long Island studio.

Moon Phase Canvas Tote

Moon Phase Canvas Tote

In order to truly appreciate the work of HMPB, it’s important to understand the characteristics of both Cyanotype and Vandyke printing. Both processes were originally discovered in the 19th Century and thus require very little in terms of resources. All you need is a photosensitive solution, a receptive surface, natural sunlight, and a little bit of knowhow to create a print. Yet because there are so many variables (i.e. intensity of the sun or the strength of the solution), no two prints will be identical. In fact, it is in these natural variations of hue and value that make these processes so unique.

Queen Anne's Lace Detail

Queen Anne’s Lace Detail

Unique Silk Scarves

Unique Silk Scarves

What I like about HMPB is that these characteristics are obvious throughout the entire collection. By nature, the photosensitive printing methods are extremely versatile in that they can be applied to different materials like paper, silk and canvas to name a few. In terms of imagery, Shapoff finds inspiration in his natural surroundings – whether in the form of lunar charts or zoological studies of marine life. Because many of these motifs are coastal, there is also a strong sense of place about his work that makes it that much more distinct.

Crab Cyanotype on Cotton Paper

Crab Cyanotype on Cotton Paper

In addition to honing the skills already mastered, HMPB is also embarking on new territory over the coming months. Shapoff is investigating ways to stimulate the American artisan economy by sourcing domestically produced linen and cotton fabrics for his own work. There are also plans to introduce different styles and goods – including an experimental collection of custom printed messenger bags.

If you are interested in learning more about Handmade on Peconic Bay, be sure to visit Shapoff’s website where you can find up to date information about new projects and inventories. In the meantime, feel free to scroll through some select images of his work in the gallery below.

Most Popular Post #4: Korean Jiseung Paper Weaving

Image courtesy of Aimee Lee

Image courtesy of Aimee Lee

Perhaps one of the most esoteric art forms in the world, Jiseung (formerly known as Noyeokgae) denotes a process by which one creates functional three-dimensional objects through spinning and weaving strips of paper. It is an incredibly technical process which requires both a patient and well-practiced touch.

The paper of choice is hanji – or Korean paper made from the inner bark of Mulberry trees. Having an unsurpassed tensile strength, hanji is perfect for Jiseung paper weavers who rely on such sturdiness to maintain the form and function of their work.

Image courtesy of Aimee Lee

Image courtesy of Aimee Lee

The paper is cut into long, thin strips and is then rolled by hand by the Jiseung master. One must pay close attention during this stage because irregular cords will affect the weaving process to come. After creating individual rolls, some masters take the extra step of spinning two of their strips together to create an even stronger thread. From there, the weaving begins.

Image courtesy of Aimee Lee

Image courtesy of Aimee Lee

Having completed the design, the entire piece is coated with a sticky rice glue to waterproof the vessel. If the paper is not dyed a desired color before the spinning process, the vessel is often coated with several layers of naturally derived sap lacquer. Once everything dries up, the end result is a completely handmade, functional, & beautiful piece of Korean craftsmanship.

If you’re interested in learning more about the process, or anything related to Korean paper-making, you can find out more from Aimee Lee’s website. You can also see more images of the process below.

Hunter + Gatherer: Letterpress Holiday Cards

Of all our holiday traditions, my absolute favorite is drinking homemade bourbon-infused eggnog. But immediately after that, I enjoy sending out a good old fashioned holiday card to friends and family. In an age where emails and texts abound, there is nothing like a handwritten note to bring you back to whats important. Here is a curated collection of letterpress cards to get you started if you haven’t already:

As this is only my second Christmas in Houston, I couldn’t resist beginning with this card from Hello! Lucky. Consider it my holiday card to all of you!

Much of the allure about letterpress printing is the indentation left in the paper. The printers at Campbell Raw Press “blind stamped” the snow angel design in the card above, leaving a texturized surface without using any ink.

If you are a scrooge, the best way to survive the wrath of holiday-aholics is to be self-aware. Egg Press has you covered.

For those who are looking for something different, you might like this homage to the Alpaca sweater from Hammer Press.

When I think of the holidays, seahorses aren’t the first thing to come to mind, but I can probably get there after having some of that eggnog I mentioned before. The holly ascots are a nice touch by Smock Press.

A cheeky card for the environmentally conscious by the Hungry Workshop.

This is a great idea from Dolce Press. You can send it as-is, or you can circle or fill in your own message. It’s a wonderful way to make the entire process more playful.

Everyone needs at least a little humor over the holidays. This is one of many deadpan cards from Sapling Press.

And finally, nothing brings the year to a close quite like merry tones from a band of gnomes. This card from Ilee Paper Goods is sure make the rounds. On another note, I wonder what song they’re playing.

Happy Carding!

Introducing “Hanji Unfurled” – The First English-Language Book on Korean Papermaking

The art of papermaking is virtually omnipresent throughout both Eastern and Western cultures, yet many of these traditions remain relatively unknown. So in an effort to combat the steady decline of these time-honored crafts, artist Aimee Lee has devoted herself to understanding and sharing the traditional paper arts of Korea. Recently, this research culminated in a 208 page hardback book that chronicles the importance and processes behind these persevering Korean crafts. Entitled Hanji Unfurled: One Journey into Korean Papermaking, the book is strewn with intimate interviews with Korean paper artists, explanations of their given art forms, and Lee’s personal anecdotes from these interactions abroad.

Sample book of dyed hanji

It’s important to note that the book is not just about papermaking. Rather it catalogues the variety of paper arts throughout Korea – including paper weaving, paper felting, natural dyeing, calligraphy, &c. Drawing on her experiences throughout her yearlong Fulbright Fellowship, Lee grants the reader direct access to the different creative values, personalities, and spaces of Korean paper artists from bustling city-centers to remote island outposts.

Mr. Shin forming a sheet of hanji in his studio

Though Hanji Unfurled is by nature a reference book, it is an extremely engaging, hands-on experience. As an artist, Lee partakes in each different paper craft, which makes for both evocative and insightful descriptions. For that reason in particular, this book is suited to those who are curious, creative, or both.

Be sure to check out the video trailer for the book above, as well as some book images in the gallery below. Similarly, if you are interested in getting (or giving) a copy of Hanji Unfurled, you can do so by clicking here. You can also find out more about Aimee Lee by visiting her artist website. There you can see works from her portfolio and learn more about her efforts to promote Korean papermaking in the United States (including her role in opening the first North American hanji center at the Morgan Conservatory in Cleveland Ohio).

Technology, Ties, & A Coloring Book

French fashion house Hermès recently launched a small series of neckties as part of their Fall/Winter 2012 line. Yet rather than celebrating the seasons, the “8″ collection captures a more distinct zeitgeist – namely the age of information.

Circuit Board Tie (image property of Hermès)

The series finds inspiration in everything involving technology, including on/off icons, 8-bit binary codes, and even Ethernet cables. Many of the ties are incredibly subtle in their use of computer-related patterning. For example, one wouldn’t necessarily know the dotted tie (above) leads into a circuit board unless you look at the backside. Not that most would be the wiser, but I enjoy the gamesmanship of reconciling a given pattern with the ‘answers’ hidden underneath. Can you see the cables below?

Print & Color Swatches (image property of Hermès)

Yet while the “8” series is an amusing ensemble, my favorite part of the project was the lookbook I received in the mail. The thin catalogue features a healthy collection of product images, interesting typography, and custom illustrations. As it turns out, I wasn’t alone in my admiration. Some of the pictures were very alluring for my little cousin who is learning how to draw. Seeing as everything in the lookbook is based in technology, it was the perfect opportunity to teach him about digital color. We went to town with RGB and CMYK:

Collaborative Coloring (image property of Hermès)

That’s right. I’m not too old for coloring books – especially of the Hermès variety!

As always, you can see more images from the lookbook below in the gallery or by visiting the Hermès website. With the weekend fast approaching, think of some things in your life that are in desperate need of color. It’s amazing how much you can achieve with a sharpie.

CMYK: Fluorescence

A contrast of biodynamic, bioluminescent, and anthropogenic fluorescence.

A Gratuitously Existential Approach to Beautiful Art – Noriko Ambe’s “Linear Action Projects”

Though she works in a variety of different media, visual artist Noriko Ambe is particularly known for her series of topographical paper cuttings. These pieces – which range from books to sculptures – are made by incising and layering individual sheets of paper one at a time. Each work seems to grow organically, but the underlying process is a grueling exercise in both patience and dedication.

Piece of A Flat Globe – 2008 (Image courtesy of the artist)

Flat Globe Installation (Image courtesy of the artist)

All of Ambe’s Linear Action Projects are cut by hand, leaving subtle imperfections throughout each piece. These idiosyncrasies are important in that they represent the “nuances of human emotion, habit, or biorhythm” that the artist investigates through her work.

Lands of Emptiness [Detail] 2003 (Image courtesy of the artist)

Yet the aspect I enjoy most about this series is the shared realization that her creative process is equally as important as the final product. In essence, each piece embodies elements of what Ambe calls “physical and emotional geography”. By cutting out layers of paper, the artist removes an object’s mass, but simultaneously defines its shape. This relationship between addition and subtraction reveals a deeper meaning in her work: the negative space in each piece is Ambe and vice versa. Evoking Jung’s concept of the empty-self, the artist posits that the surgeon and the incision are manifestations of a single, paradoxical existence.

All philosophy/art theory aside, Ambe can certainly produce some beautiful work. Be sure to scroll through the images below for a tailored look at her Linear Action Projects. You can see more of this series (as well as other works) by visiting her website. In the meantime, feel free to share your thoughts, comments, or existential crises.

City Guide – Paris, France

Having recently returned from my first visit to Paris, I thought it appropriate to sift through the experiences I had during my stay and translate them into a brief city-guide. However, I wanted to do something a bit different. Most guides I’ve read highlight the obligations (i.e. “must-sees” and “must-eats”), but then follow with a phonebook-sized list of almost everything else available in the city. While it’s wonderful to have so many options to choose from, I thought a curated guide would give a more intimate glimpse into the side of Paris I enjoyed. My hope is to shed light on rewarding experiences that one might not seek out on their own. After all, there is so much to see that it’s easy to overlook what’s in our periphery.

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Just because it is the biggest, oldest, or most famous attraction does not guarantee that it is the most impressive. Below are my top two visits that many may overlook. But before deciding where to go, it’s good to know how to get there…

The Paris Pass

The first thing you should do after booking flights and accommodations is look into the Paris Pass. There are different options available, but the basic principle is to streamline your visit as much as possible through unimpeded use of mass transit (buses, RER, & metro), free entry into almost all museums/monuments, and the ability to save time by skipping lines. You pay a given fee upfront for your pass before it is mailed to you, but the price is more than reasonable given how much money and time you will save during your stay. You can find more information here.

When planning your visit, it’s worth noting that many shops/boutiques around the city are closed on Mondays. Similarly, a majority of museums are closed on Tuesdays. There are exceptions though, so it’s worth the research. Many museums also have late night admission 1-2 times during the week. If that’s the case, see everything else during the day and enjoy the given museum at night when the crowds have dispersed and you have the collection to yourself.

Sainte Chapelle

Sainte Chapelle (wiki-rendering)

Although Sainte Chapelle barely escapes the shadows cast by Notre Dame, visitors often skip this relatively small chapel when visiting Île de la Cité in the heart of Paris. Originally built to house King Louix IX’s expansive collection of relics, the chapel is now known for its incredible stained-glass windows that encompass the entire building. While it’s important to see as many sights as possible, I was actually far more impressed by Sainte Chapelle than I was with Notre Dame. In a pinch, I would choose to visit the former.

A taste of the stained glass (post restoration)

The chapel is currently in the final stretch of a 3-4 year restoration project, so a small portion of the glass is obscured at the moment. However, now is a great time to visit as you can’t find cleaner glass anywhere else! Check the website for a calendar of events that often features classical music recitals. I’ve heard the chapel has wonderful (albeit ethereal) acoustics.

4 Boulevard du Palais, 75001 Paris, France
Tel: (33) 01 44 54 19 33
1 Mar – 31 Oct: open everyday from 9:30A to 6:00P
1 Nov – 28 Feb: open everyday from 9:00A to 5:00P
Closed: 1 January, 1 May, & 25 December

Palais de Tokyo

The Palais de Tokyo is a modern space with a heavy emphasis on contemporary installation art. That said, it is also harbor to a constant flux of video, 2D work, design, and musical performances.

The work there tends to be cutting-edge and thought provoking, so it promises to be a memorable visit for any fan of the arts. The complex is also known for its incredible bookstore.

13, Avenue du Président Wilson, 
75116 Paris, France
Tel: 01 47 23 54 01
Wednesday through Monday from 12:00P-12:00A

***Closes early at 6:00P on 24 & 31 December
Closed: Tuesdays; 1 January, 1 May, & 25 December

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When looking for dining options in Paris, virtually anybody can find great restaurants like Café des Musees or Robert et Louise. Not that these cafes are a dime a dozen, but I enjoyed stepping out of the “Parisian” culinary experience in seeking out something a bit different…

Soya – Cantine Bio

Although Paris is known for its epicurean standards, it is not regarded as vegetarian-friendly. However, the casual yet elevated vegetarian fusion at Soya is a notable exception and is worth seeking out even if you are an omnivore.

The restaurant is tucked away on a not-so-busy street in Le Marais, which is a great area in and of itself. The atmosphere is open and laid back, yet they remain very calculated in what they serve. Their menu is comprised of changing seasonal dishes, all of which are all made using local and organic ingredients. They even have many naturally gluten-free dinner options for those with dietary restrictions.

20, Rue de la Pierre Levée, 75011 Paris, France
Tel : 01 48 06 33 02
Mon-Fri: 12:00 P – 3:30P; 7:00P – 11:00P
Sat-Sun: 11:30A – 4:00P

Helmut Newcake

It might seem somewhat counter-intuitive, but the best pastries I had while in France were from Helmut Newcake – a gluten-free café/patisserie located in the 10th arrondissement. While my diet is the last thing one could call gluten-free, I was nonetheless floored by the textures and flavors in their crusts. Nowhere else in Paris could I find a better lemon tart (believe me, I tried), but everything they served was exquisite – including their daily lunch selections which featured various quiche and rice dishes among other offerings.

Unfortunately, they don’t have a website but you can find them via Facebook or by visiting:

36 Rue Bichat, 75010 Paris, France
Tel: 09 82 59 00 39
Wed-Sat: 12:00P – 8:00P
Sun: 10:00A – 6:00P

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Personally, shopping is always an important aspect of any trip. I find however that it pays to be a curator rather than a consumer. Here’s a good way to go about it:

Repetto Stock Store

For decades, Repetto has been a staple of Parisian style. Although the label began by solely making ballet slippers, they quickly branched out into the fashion world by introducing their hand-made, everyday shoes to the everyday market. If you searching for a pair, be sure to visit their ‘hidden’ stock store in the 9th Arrondissement for a good deal. Although it’s apparently a well-kept Paris secret, my girlfriend and I noticed a couple eager shoppers collecting outside the unmarked entrance just before opening time. They had a solid collection of last season’s shoes, interesting colors, and assorted handbags, so there is sure to be something there for everyone. Remember though, you didn’t hear about it from Procured Design.

24 Rue de Châteaudun, 75009 Paris, France
Tel: 33 01 53 32 84 84
Tues-Sat: 10:30A-7:00P

Calligrane

Some familiar work from Issac Reina

The area surrounding Rue du Pont Louis Philippe just north of the Seine is packed full of interesting shops and cafes. However, the best visit I had was Calligrane – a store devoted to stationery, specialty paper goods, book arts, and leatherwork. Originally founded in Cannes, the boutique has been in operation since 1979. Their phenomenal stock of rare papers and unique handmade goods is the product of years spent traveling the world, conversing with artisans in Nepal, India, Japan, Brasil, Bhutan, and Europe.

Paper Sculpture by Miki Nakamura

The shop showcases a diverse stable of different paper, book, and leather artists who work towards vastly different realizations of their given craft. It is an incredibly rich experience to poke around the shop and talk to the owners, who just recently took the reins of their family’s business. It’s also a great opportunity to pick up some well-curated handmade goods – or even order custom stationery, notebooks, and business cards.

6 Rue du Pont Louis Philippe, 75004 Paris, France
Tel: 01 48 04 09 00
Tues-Sat: 12:00P-7:00P

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While there is so much more to see and do in the city, it’s best to leave the rest to you to discover. Each trip will have different highlights for different people. That said, feel free to share your favorite places and experiences in Paris – or anywhere for that matter. It’s always nice to know where to go!

The Paper Jewelry of Janna Syvänoja

On the off chance there is a word to sum up the jewelry by Finnish artist Janna Syvänoja, it would be ‘organic.’ The major component in her work is paper – namely clippings from discarded phonebooks and newspapers. In meticulously curving each piece of paper around a steel wire, Syvänoja evokes a delicate and elegant fluidity through her forms – as if they are arrested in mid-motion.

 

Texture plays a major role in her paper jewelry, both in a visual and a tactile sense. Printed words and letters are rendered illegible, reducing their meaning to tiny moments of color and tone. They instead create a unique quill-like pattern throughout each piece.

 

The process behind each work is an open one. In adding each layer one by one, the artist allows for each piece to grow in its own direction. The patterning on the surface of her works is not predetermined. Rather it is created by a combination of happenstance and the will of her materials.

 Click on the thumbnails in the gallery below for more images of her work. Syvänoja doesn’t seem to have her own website, but you can find more information about her and her process online.

Levenger’s “Circa” Notebook

Dieter Rams often said that “good design is as little design as possible.” Apparently someone at Levenger paid attention to that morsel when they came up with the Circa Notebook system. Essentially, Circa is a unique way of organizing paper documents within a single notebook, which allows for pages to be rearranged, removed, and even inserted. In other words, it’s not only a way to get organized, but it ensures that you stay organized.

Rhodia Circa Notebook

 The system hinges on a special variation on a standard hole punch.  Rather than the three-hole punch for binders, the Circa punch creates a toothy pattern along the edge of each loose piece of paper. Instead of a spine, the Circa notebooks are held together by a series of discs which fit perfectly in the grooves left by the punch. You are then left with pages that you can insert and remove without any tears or trauma to the spine.

Circa – Remove/Insert Page

Circa “Spine” Detail

Levenger offers a wide assortment of different insert options (including a partnership with Rhodia notebooks) which are pre-punched for convenience. That said, the best part of the Circa system is the ability to punch any loose piece of paper to make it compatible.

Circa Punch

Often Overlooked – León Ferrari

            Those who are familiar with artist León Ferrari tend to know him based on the injustices he has endured throughout his career – whether it be political censorship or simple the fact that he (along with many other Latin American artists) was long overlooked in favor of modernist painters from America and Europe. Yet the status of many South American artists in the art market has greatly improved throughout the last decade. Acting on the relatively recent praise of MOMA and The Tate, investors and art collectors are scrambling to acquire pieces from the now 92-year old artist’s portfolio before he is unable to produce any more work.

[Untitled] 1977; Ink on paper; 24″ x 16 1/4″

            But all art exploitation speculation aside, Ferrari’s work has become synonymous with social criticism and political protest. Yet while most are content to talk about conceptual backing in art, it seems few step back to simply appreciate the sensory qualities of the works at hand. Ferrari is an artist who requires both sorts of appreciation from his viewers. It is imperative to discuss and debate the meaning behind his work, but it is equally as important to enjoy his execution.

            Of all the aesthetic qualities throughout Ferrari’s portfolio, his relationship with line is particularly striking. There is a great diversity throughout his line-based drawings and prints. The pieces are all unified by approach, but differ in terms of character.

 For example, the violent and frenzied scratching in his “Escritura” 1976 starkly contrasts his untitled drawing of the same year (both pictured below). The latter piece evokes a sense of music, both in it’s overall resemblance to score sheets and the fluid, dance-like swaying of the line.

“Escritura” 1976; Ink on paper; 18 1/4″ x 13″

[Untitled] 1976; Ink on paper; 19 3/4″ x 113 1/2″

 Conversely, the following untitled piece from 1963 not only recalls both pictographic and hieroglyphic scripts, but also investigates a synthesis of the two.

[Untitled] 1963; Ink on paper; 18 3/4″ x 12 1/4″

   His scribbles on polystyrene evoke a Cy Twombly-esque energy, only to be revisited on the surface of a three-dimensional plexiglass cube in 1999.

[Untitled] (date unknown); Graphite on Polystyrene; 19 1/4″ x 13″

“Prism” 1999; Ink on Plexi; 23 5/8″ x 7 7/8″ x 7 7/8″

     Though it is merely a small facet of an overall artistic ability, the variety by which Ferrari employs line offers a sound insight into his approach. As his better known, politically-charged pieces demonstrate, there are always different perspectives on a given idea or issue; even those as mundane as line.

Korean Jiseung Weaving

Image courtesy of Aimee Lee

Image courtesy of Aimee Lee

Perhaps one of the most esoteric art forms in the world, Jiseung (formerly known as Noyeokgae) denotes a process by which one creates functional three-dimensional objects through spinning and weaving strips of paper. It is an incredibly technical process which requires both a patient and well-practiced touch.

The paper of choice is hanji – or Korean paper made from the inner bark of Mulberry trees.   Having an unsurpassed tensile strength, hanji is perfect for Jiseung paper weavers who rely on such sturdiness to maintain the form and function of their work.

Image courtesy of Aimee Lee

Image courtesy of Aimee Lee

The paper is cut into long, thin strips and is then rolled by hand by the Jiseung master. One must pay close attention during this stage because irregular cords will affect the weaving process to come. After creating individual rolls, some masters take the extra step of spinning two of their strips together to create an even stronger thread. From there, the weaving begins.

Image courtesy of Aimee Lee

Image courtesy of Aimee Lee

Having completed the design, the entire piece is coated with a sticky rice glue to waterproof the vessel. If the paper is not dyed a desired color before the spinning process,  the vessel is often coated with several layers of naturally derived sap lacquer. Once everything dries up, the end result is a completely handmade, functional, & beautiful piece of Korean craftsmanship.

If you’re interested in learning more about the process, or anything related to Korean paper-making, you can find out more from Aimee Lee’s website. You can also see more images of the process below.

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